coax
[ kohks ]
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Part of Speech verb
Origin + Etymology
Late 16th century; English; From the obsolete cokes "simpleton," of unknown origin. The original sense was "fondle," hence "persuade by caresses or flattery," the underlying sense being "make a simpleton of".
Synonyms
    1.
  • cajol entice induce
    2.
  • nudge pull wriggle
Antonyms
    1.
  • discourage repel repulse turn off
    2.
  • secure
Definition
1. to attempt to influence by gentle persuasion, flattery, etc.; cajole
2. to manipulate to a desired end by adroit handling or persistent effort
Examples
1. A) He tried to coax them into joining him in skipping work, but no one was moved. B) I will try to coax my mother into allowing me to go out tonight, but she can be really stubborn.
2. A) We were aiming to coax the keys out of the vent, but we only ended up knocking them further away. B) The stones were stuck fast, and our attempts to coax them apart were for naught.
Usage Over Time

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